Content

Content - Volume 51, Issue 9

Editors choice in this issue

ORIGINAL REPORT
A physical activity intervention to prevent cognitive decline after stroke: Secondary results from the Life After STroke study, an 18-month randomized controlled trial
Hege Ihle-Hansen, Birgitta Langhammer, Stian Lydersen, Mari Gunnes, Bent Indredavik, Torunn Askim
Objective: To examine the effects of individualized regular coaching and exercise on post-stroke cognitive and emotional function. Methods: The Life After STroke (LAST) study investigated the differences between intervention and care-as-usual between 3 and 21 months post-stroke. Outcome measures were the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Hospital Anxiety and ...
Pages: 646-651
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Risk factors for rotator cuff tendinopathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Hio Teng Leong, Sai Chuen Fu, Xin He, Joo Han Oh, Nobuyuki Yamamoto, Shu Hang Patrick Yung
Objectives: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify risk and associated factors for symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Data sources: PubMed, CINAHL and Scopus were searched from inception to June 2017. Study selection: Participants presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of rotator cuff tendinopathy/tendinosis/tendinitis, shoulder impingement syndrome, or subacromia ...
Pages: 627-637
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Evidence-based rehabilitation therapy following surgery for (peri-)articular fractures: A systematic review
Marlous L.A.P. Schnackers, Yvette Y. van Horn, Guido H. H. Meys, Peter R.G. Brink, Rob J.E.M. Smeets, Henk A.M. Seelen
Objective: To assess the availability of explicitly reported protocols describing post-surgery rehabilitation of (peri-)articular fractures of the proximal humerus, acetabulum and/or tibial plateau, and to critically review any scientific evidence on the effectiveness of these protocols. Data sources: MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane databases, CINAHL, PEDro and Embase (Ovid) were searched to November ...
Pages: 638-645
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ORIGINAL REPORT
A physical activity intervention to prevent cognitive decline after stroke: Secondary results from the Life After STroke study, an 18-month randomized controlled trial
Hege Ihle-Hansen, Birgitta Langhammer, Stian Lydersen, Mari Gunnes, Bent Indredavik, Torunn Askim
Objective: To examine the effects of individualized regular coaching and exercise on post-stroke cognitive and emotional function. Methods: The Life After STroke (LAST) study investigated the differences between intervention and care-as-usual between 3 and 21 months post-stroke. Outcome measures were the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Hospital Anxiety and ...
Pages: 646-651
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Intra- and inter-rater reliability of Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Upper Extremity in stroke
Edgar D. Hernández, Claudia P. Galeano, Nubia E. Barbosa, Sandra M. Forero, Åsa Nordin, Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Margit Alt Murphy
Objective: The Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) is recommended for evaluation of sensorimotor impairment post stroke, but the item-level reliability of the scale is unknown. The study aims to determine intra- and inter-rater reliability of the FMA-UE at item-, subscale- and total score level in patients with early subacute stroke. Design: Intra/inter-rater reliability. Subjects: ...
Pages: 652-659
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Self-perceived impact of stroke: A longitudinal comparison between one and five years post-stroke
Erik Skoglund, Emma Westerlind, Hanna C. Persson, Katharina S. Sunnerhagen
Objective: To investigate different aspects of self-perceived impact of stroke 1 and 5 years after stroke onset, with a focus on self-perceived participation. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Participants: Forty-five persons diagnosed with first-time stroke included in the Stroke Arm Longitudinal study at University of Gothenburg (SALGOT). Methods: Participants responded to the Stroke Impact ...
Pages: 660-664
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Factors associated with willingness to use eRehabilitation after stroke: A cross-sectional study among patients, informal caregivers and healthcare professionals
Berber Brouns, Jorit J.L. Meesters, Manon M. Wentink, Arend J. de Kloet , Henk J. Arwert , Liesbeth W. Boyce, Thea P.M. Vliet Vlieland, Leti van Bodegom-Vos
Objective: Despite the increasing availability of eRehabilitation, its use remains limited. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with willingness to use eRehabilitation. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Subjects: Stroke patients, informal caregivers, health-care professionals. Methods: The survey included personal characteristics, willingness to use eRehabilitation (yes/no) a ...
Pages: 665-674
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ORIGINAL REPORT
The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) and the WHO Minimal Generic Set of Domains of Functioning and Health versus Conventional Instruments in subacute stroke
Sinikka Tarvonen-Schröder, Saija Hurme, Katri Laimi
Objective: To compare short generic International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)-based measures of functioning with traditional measures of stroke severity and dependence in subacute stroke. Methods: In this cross-sectional study patients with stroke (n = 195) and their significant others completed the 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedul ...
Pages: 675-682
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Comparison of measurement properties of three shortened versions of the balance evaluation system test (BESTest) in people with subacute stroke
Thitimard Winairuk, Marco Y.C. Pang, Vitoon Saengsirisuwan, Fay B. Horak, Rumpa Boonsinsukh
Objectives: To examine the reliability, validity and responsiveness of 3 different short versions of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest: S--BESTest, Brief-BESTest and Mini-BESTest) in patients with subacute stroke. Design: A prospective cohort study. Participants: Patients with subacute stroke. Methods: Patients were assessed using the full BESTest. Scores of 3 short-form BESTests w ...
Pages: 683-691
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for adults with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders: A pilot study
Dong-Mei Suo, Lin-lin Liu, Kun Jia, Lin-jie Zhang, Li-Min Li, Jing Wang, Yuan Qi, Hai-jie Liu, Chun-Xiao Wan, Li Yang
Objective: To provide detailed data on the effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with moderate to severe disability. Design: A pilot randomized control study. Subjects/patients: A total of 39 patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder were randomized into intervention or control groups. Methods: The intervention group rec ...
Pages: 692-697
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Effect of adding lay-tutors to the educational part of a back school programme for patients with subacute, non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled clinical trial with a two-year follow-up
Inge Grundt Larsen, Lisa Gregersen Oestergaard, Lene M. Thomsen, Claus Vinther Nielsen, Berit Schiøttz-Christensen
Objective: To evaluate the effect of adding a lay-tutor to the educational sessions of a back school programme for patients with subacute low back pain. Methods: Patients with subacute low back pain were randomized to a 10-week programme comprising 10 h education and 20 h physical exercise led by a former patient as lay-tutor, or a programme led by a physiotherapist. In the intervention group, fo ...
Pages: 698-704
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Efficacy of belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation on reducing the rate of muscle volume loss in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled trial
Kensuke Nakamura, Atsushi Kihata, Hiromu Naraba, Naoki Kanda, Yuji Takahashi, Tomohiro Sonoo, Hideki Hashimoto, Naoto Morimura
Objectives: Belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation can induce muscle contraction of the whole lower body. This study examined the efficacy of belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation on reducing loss of muscle volume in critically ill patients. Methods: Intensive care unit patients were randomly assigned to control and electrical muscle stimulation groups. In both grou ...
Pages: 705-711
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ORIGINAL REPORT
Preoperative high-intensity interval training is effective and safe in deconditioned patients with lung cancer: A randomized clinical trial
Chetna Bhatia, Bengt Kayser
Background: The outcome of surgery in deconditioned patients can be improved through prehabilitation. This study examined the effect of prehabilitation in patients diagnosed with lung cancer. Methods: Candidates for lung cancer resection were assigned to high-intensity interval training (n = 74) or usual care (n = 77). Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and 6-min walk test were performed b ...
Pages: 712-718
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