Content » Vol 52, Issue 4

Original report

Rehabilitation in warm climate for young adults with inflammatory arthritis: A 12-month randomized controlled trial

Ingrid Rekaa Nilssen, Hege Svean Koksvik, Kjersti Grønning, Aslak Steinsbekk
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Pregnancy and Rheumatic diseases, Department of Rheumatology, St. Olavs hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. E-mail: Ingrid.Rekaa.Nilssen@stolav.no
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2666

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate if an intensive rehabilitation programme, including intensive exercise and patient education, for young adults with inflammatory arthritis, conducted in a warm climate, has long-term effects on general health status compared with usual care.
Design: Open randomized controlled trial.
Patients: A total of 64 patients with inflammatory arthritis, aged 20–35 years.
Methods: Patients underwent randomized allocation to an intensive 17-day rehabilitation programme in a warm climate (intervention group) or to usual care with no structured rehabilitation (control group). The primary outcomes were physical function, assessed by the “30-second Sit to Stand test”(30sSTS), and coping, measured by the “Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale” (EC17).
Results: A total of 64 patients (mean age 27.5 years, 62.5% female) were randomized. Thirty out of 32 patients completed the intervention. At 12-month follow-up, 7 patients were lost to follow-up; 4 from the intervention group and 3 from the control group. The intervention group showed significant improvement in the physical function test at 3 months; estimated mean difference (95% confidence interval): 5.5 (2.8–8.1), 6 months 3.6 (0.4–6.8) and 12 months 4.0 (0.0–7.9), compared with the control group. There were no differences in coping between the 2 groups at 3, 6 or 12 months.
Conclusion: Rehabilitation in a warm climate improves physical functioning, but not coping, in young adults with inflammatory arthritis.

Lay Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate if an intensive rehabilitation programme, including intensive exercise and patient education, developed for young adults with inflammatory arthritis, conducted in a warm climate, has long-term effects on general health status compared with usual care. A total of 64 participants, aged 20–35 years, were assigned to an intervention group (= 32) or control group (= 32). The intervention
group participated in a 17-day rehabilitation programme (intensive exercise, individual physiotherapy and patient education) in a warm climate. The control group received usual care with no structured rehabilitation. The intervention improved patient’s physical function, but not coping, up to 1 year post-intervention, compared with usual care.

Comments

Do you want to comment on this paper? The comments will show up here and if appropriate the comments will also separately be forwarded to the authors. You need to login/create an account to comment on articles. Click here to login/create an account.
Advertisement