Content » Vol 50, Issue 10

Review article

Efficacy of hyaluronic acid after knee arthroscopy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Dongjun Shen, Maoxi Chen, Kai Chen, Tao Wang, Laijin Lu, Xingguang Yang
Department of Orthopedics, Fenghua People’s Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2366

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of hyaluronic acid on functional recovery and pain control in patients following knee arthroscopy.
Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the efficacy of hyaluronic acid following knee arthroscopy.
Subjects and methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of hyaluronic acid in knee arthroscopy were included. A meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model.
Results: Six RCTs involving 310 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention following knee arthroscopy, hyaluronic acid treatment was found to significantly increase Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores (mean difference 11.43; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) 1.39–21.47; p = 0.03), but had no impact on pain scores at 2 weeks (mean difference –0.16; 95% CI –0.81–0.49; p = 0.63), pain scores at 6 weeks (mean difference 0.01; 95% CI –0.86–0.89; p = 0.98), pain scores at 12 weeks (mean difference –0.51; 95% CI –1.56–0.53; p = 0.34). In addition, pain on motion was significantly reduced after knee arthroscopy (risk ratio (RR) 0.22; 95% CI 0.06–0.79; p = 0.02).
Conclusion: Compared with control intervention after knee arthroscopy, hyaluronic acid treatment was found to significantly improve WOMAC score and decrease pain on motion, but had no substantial influence on pain scores at 2, 6 and 12 weeks after knee arthroscopy.

Lay Abstract

Hyaluronic acid might be beneficial for patients after knee arthroscopy. However, the results remain controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the efficacy of hyaluronic acid following knee arthroscopy. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of hyaluronic acid in knee arthroscopy were included. Compared with control intervention after knee arthroscopy, hyaluronic acid treatment was found to significantly improve Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and decrease pain on motion, but had no substantial influence on pain scores at 2, 6 and 12 weeks after knee arthroscopy.

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