Content » Vol 53, Issue 3

Original report

Predictors for self-reported feeling of depression three months after stroke: A longitudinal cohort study

Janina Kaarre, Tamar Abzhandadze, Katharina S. Sunnerhagen
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2816

Abstract

Objective: Depression and impaired cognition are common consequences of stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether cognitive impairment 36–48 h post-stroke could predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke.
Design: A longitudinal, cohort study.
Patients: Patients aged ≥ 18 years at stroke onset.
Methods: Cognition was screened using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, 36–48 h after admission to the stroke unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Information about self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke was retrieved from Riksstroke (the national quality register for stroke in Sweden). Bootstrapped binary logistic regression
analyses were performed.
Results: Of 305 patients, 42% were female, median age was 70 years, and 65% had mild stroke. Three months post-stroke, 56% of patients had self-reported feeling of depression; of these, 65% were female. Impaired cognition at baseline could not predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months later. The odds for self-reported feeling of depression were twice as high in female patients (odds ratio 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.20–1.22; p < 0.01).
Conclusion: Impaired cognition early after stroke could not predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months post-stroke. Compared with male patients, female patients had twice the odds of self-reported feeling of depression

Lay Abstract

Depression and impaired cognition are common consequences of stroke. This study investigated whether screening for cognitive function 36–48 h after stroke could predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months later. Of the 305 patients with mild stroke, 56% had self-reported feeling of depression. Cognitive impairment could not predict self-reported feeling of depression. Therefore, cognitive screening within the first 2 days after stroke might be too early to predict self-reported feeling of depression 3 months after stroke. However, the high proportion of patients with self-reported feeling of depression indicates the severity of the problem that needs to be addressed.

Supplementary content

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