Objective: The main objective of this investigation was to identify a set of v..." />Objective: The main objective of this investigation was to identify a set of v...">
Content » Vol 35, Issue 6

On prediction of vocational rehabilitation outcome at a Swedish employability institute

Roland Melin and Axel R. Fugl-Meyer
Department of Neuroscience Rehabilitation Medicine Uppsala University and the Employability Institute Uppsala Sweden
DOI: 10.1080/16501970310012437

Abstract

Objective: The main objective of this investigation was to identify a set of variables usable in early outcome prediction of vocational rehabilitation. Design: On commencement of rehabilitation at an employability institute, data were sampled using structured interviews and checklists. Two years later the subjects were followed up by telephone interviews. Subjects: The study sample was all unemployed with a somatic disorder as the cause of vocational disability, admitted from October 1995 to December 1996 (n = 149). Of these 109 (73%) agreed to participate. Methods: Initially, data on demography, symptoms, expectations/beliefs about future capacity for gainful employment and sense of coherence (as an indicator of coping resources) were sampled. At follow-up the subjects' vocational situations were recorded. Results: At follow-up, 40% were working or employable. Among the about 30 variables included, logistic regression showed that having a relatively high belief in vocational return (odds ratio, OR: 4.6, CI: 1.4-15.4), having a relatively high sense of coherence (OR: 3.5, CI: 1.5-8.4) and having a relatively high educational level (OR: 2.6, CI: 1.1-6.3) were significant predictors of positive outcome. Conclusion: In this sample, socio-psychological and educational aspects were far more predictive of outcome than were medical circumstances.

Lay Abstract

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