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Original report

Improved walking ability and reduced therapeutic stress with an electromechanical gait device

doi: 10.2340/16501977-0422

Open access

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of repetitive locomotor training using a newly developed electromechanical gait device compared with treadmill training/gait training with respect to patient’s ambulatory motor outcome, necessary personnel resources, and discomfort experienced by therapists and patients.
METHODS: Randomized, controlled, cross-over trial. Sixteen non-ambulatory patients after stroke, severe brain or spinal cord injury sequentially received 2 kinds of gait training. Study intervention A: 20 treatments of locomotor training with an electromechanical gait device; control intervention B: 20 treatments of locomotor training with treadmill or task-oriented gait training. The primary variable was walking ability (Functional Ambulation Category). Secondary variables included gait velocity, Motricity-Index, Rivermead-Mobility-Index, number of therapists needed, and discomfort and effort of patients and therapists during training.
RESULTS: Gait ability and the other motor outcome related parameters improved for all patients, but without significant difference between intervention types. However, during intervention A, significantly fewer therapists were needed, and they reported less discomfort and a lower level of effort during training sessions.
CONCLUSION: Locomotor training with or without an electromechanical gait trainer leads to improved gait ability; however, using the electromechanical gait trainer requires less therapeutic assistance, and therapist discomfort is reduced.

Authors:

Susanna Freivogel, Dieter Schmalohr, Jan Mehrholz

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Volume 41, Issue 9

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0422

Pages: 734-739

View at PubMed