Content » Vol 48, Issue 3

Original report

Effects of aerobic interval training on measures of anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: A prospective non-randomized trial

Kjetil Isaksen, Peter Scott Munk, Rune Giske, Alf Inge Larsen
Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital,. PO Box-box 8100, NO-4068 Stavanger, Norway. E-mail: kjetil.isaksen@lyse.net, kjetil.x.isaksen@gmail.com
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2043

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of aerobic interval training on quality of life and on symptoms of anxiety and depression among patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.
Design: Prospective, non-randomized controlled study.
Subjects: Patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, willing to undergo an aerobic interval training programme. A total of 31 patients were enrolled (19 were assigned to the aerobic interval training group and 12 to the control group).
Methods: The aerobic interval training group performed a 12-week exercise training programme. All patients were evaluated with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at baseline, after 12 weeks and at 2 years.
Results: The aerobic interval training group showed significant improvements in several SF-36 subscores at 12 weeks. There was an unadjusted significant reduction in the HADS depression (HADS-D) score. At follow-up, results in the aero-bic interval training group moved towards baseline or remained stable, whereas in the control group HADS-D scores and some SF-36 subscores deteriorated.
Conclusion: Participation in a 12-week aerobic interval training programme resulted in significant improvements in several measures of quality of life and the unadjusted HADS-D score in patients with ischaemic heart failure with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. At follow-up there was significantly less sedentary activity in the aerobic interval training group, while psychometric measures were no longer significantly different from baseline.

Lay Abstract

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